Friday Fitness

A Little Progress.

You may find your progress coming quickly, and then it plateaus.  Or, it may be coming slow and then take off.  Either way, you have to remind yourself it is a process.  When I was on my journey to recovery, after my accident, I HATED being told that.  Unfortunately, its true–its a process–and these kinds of things take time.

For the last few weeks I have been working on strengthening my legs, specifically my knees, cardio, and chest.

My workout, to get started, for a few weeks has consisted of the following:

  1. 5 min warm up
  2. Step ups, 1 rep x 15, both legs
  3. Single leg step ups, 2 reps x 15, both legs
  4. Lunges for 15 ft., forward then backward lunge, 2x each
  5.  Single leg Romanian deadlift  2 reps x 10, both legs
  6. Butt against wall, bend over and grabs.  1 rep x 10
  7. Single–leg chair lunges, 1 reps x 10, both legs
  8. Ankle resistance band forward walk, 15 ft, there and back
  9. 5 min cool down

UPDATE

This week was great!  Got in a workout everyday and took off Saturday and Sunday for rest.  I definitely felt the soreness most nights, and some nights it affected my sleep.  There are a few things you can do to decrease soreness, but sometimes its simply unavoidable–especially if you are upping your workouts in any way.

“Active & Passive Stretching.”

Stretching is a sure fire way to easing soreness the next day.  While in college, I wrote several papers discussing research on which method of stretching works the best–the main conclusion was that the area of stretching as a whole needed more research.  However, active (dynamic) stretching did show to help some people prior to activity.  That is, stretching by doing movements that you will also be doing more intensely during your workout or activity, and then do passive (static) stretches once you are finished.  For a little more info click HERE.

“DOMS.”

By implementing some of these techniques, you will also decrease your likelihood of acquiring DOMS–delayed onset of muscle soreness.  Which is bad soreness that doesn’t come on until 24-48 hrs after your workout.

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